3 Days in Springfield MO

3 Days in Springfield MO

The American Eagle plane touched down in Springfield, MO, a perfect Saturday morning for flying, we met outside security, to connect with my long-time gal pal, Trisha. We picked up my pink overnight bag, and immediately headed down Hi-Way 60 and across 65 to Mansfield, MO, to the site of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Historic Home and Museum.

We purchased tickets for the museum as well as tours of the old white farmhouse and the Rock House, a Sears’ plan called “the Mitchell”, both locations where Laura wrote many of the Little House on the Prairie books. Those of us of a certain age growing up in the Midwest remember these books depicting rural life in our neck of the woods — I own the nine volume set myself — as some of the first books we loved to read and reread during our elementary school days.  I would read one book in a setting.  The Rocky Ridge Farm is picturesque with lots of old hardwood trees and rolling pastures; however, the apple orchard described in her books didn’t make it through the dust bowl era.  The museum is new as is the welcome center and of course, they have a great gift shop full of memorabilia, books written by both Laura and her equally talented daughter, Rose.

After the tour,  we trekked on down the road to discover our next great female figure in the literary arts from these parts.  Her name is Rose O’Neill and her homestead, named Bonniebrook, located near Branson, originally built-in stages beginning in 1898, later painstakingly reconstructed from old photos and interviews with family and from the fading memories of prior visitors. The original home burned to the ground in 1947, long after Rose’s death. The replica home, complete with Rose’s studio on third floor,  is now open for tours (closes at 3 p.m. so plan accordingly) as well as  offering a gift shop and small museum featuring the artist’s illustrations and paintings.  Rose O’Neill is most famous for the creation of the Kewpie but I quickly learned that she was a pioneering female illustrator, poet, novelist and activist

The Kewpie museum is a testament to the marketing genius of Rose O’Neill. The museum houses antique Kewpie ephemera of O’Neill’s era. From dolls to door knockers, you will see hundreds of Kewpie items that were sold during the Kewpie boom which swept the world in the early 20th Century.  But of most interest to me were her sketches from greek mythology including fairies, giants and trolls.  Rose wore long flowing velvet caftans to avoid wearing a corset (which she found so disadvantageous to women) and surrounded herself with artists of all types, many not as talented as Rose but she never turned anyone away.

The best quote I read of hers was that she said she was often asked by other artists to critique their work, and she avoided any comments as she said “it was too cruel to crush a kitten.”  Her unconditional love of family and friends and the Depression resulted in her losing all of her money and ending up poor again and her beloved Bonniebrook crumbling around her, unable to pay for basic repairs.

That early summer evening, after driving back to Springfield, exhausted from the day of traveling,  sightseeing, reflection and me, a little bleary-eyed from a cough and congestion, we opted for conversation on the porch, a glass of Merlot and to bed by 9 p.m.

The next day, we ate a healthy, fresh, breakfast at First Watch. If you haven’t checked out this place for breakfast it is always consistently good and fresh.  I opted for the Eggs Benedict Florentine and my friend selected steel oats with fresh fruit and a blueberry muffin.  This fortified us for several hours of touring the Springfield Art Museum which is free to the public and sits next to a pretty park for picnicking if you like.  We toured the temporary exhibit featuring more of Rose’s work called:  Frolic of the Mind: The Illustrious Life of Rose O’Neill

From the curator:  This exhibit takes as its underlying theme the unification of all of O’Neill’s creative pursuits and examines how they each were related, one to the other, from her hundreds of illustrations for the major periodicals of the day to her many illustrated advertisements, from her creation of the Kewpie doll to her more secretive “Sweet Monster” drawings. Each of these are rooted in the singular mind of Rose O’Neill – a woman who created a life on her own terms with sheer will, determination and creative talent. The ability to pursue all of her interests, in spite of the strict social rules placed upon women at the turn of the century, is perhaps the most fascinating story of them all. Rose O’Neill, the twice-divorced suffragist lived a life unbound, an iconoclast, and a rebel among reformers – yet she was beloved by nearly all who knew her.  

Trisha hosted an intimate cocktail party that evening in her home to introduce me to some of  her Springfield girlfriends — which I all quite adored.  Of course, several were fellow Kansans and Texans so what’s not to love.  The shrimp cocktail and wine pairings were sublime.

The final morning  of my long week-end in Mizzou was spent at the Wonders of the Wild, a brain child of the founder of Cabela’s, headquartered in Springfield.  My friends are volunteers and spend Monday’s shepherding guests through the indoor swamp area and around massive salt water tanks including a look at a shy octopus and beautiful coral.  Trisha is dubbed the Octopus Lady by many returning guests for her knowledge of all facts — octopus-related.  If you love aquariums, you don’t want to miss this one.

My short flight back on Monday was on time and I was back in the Fort by 6 p.m.  Even though I was fighting a bad cold, this trip was memorable in that I learned more about our history, our marine environment and the importance of staying connected to friends, both old and new.

Thank you to my Springfield hosts, Trisha (the octopus lady) and Mike.  I also appreciated all of the resilient women I learned about, from Laura Ingalls Wilder who published her first book at 65, to Rose O’Neill who grew up poor in Nebraska but at 13 won her first prize for her drawing talents and brought her family out of poverty to Bonneville, to the ladies of Springfield who shared their life journey’s with me over wine, and to my dear friends Trisha and Mike, the most resilient of all.

“My scars remind me that I did indeed survive my deepest wounds. That in itself is an accomplishment. And they bring to mind something else, too. They remind me that the damage life has inflicted on me has, in many places, left me stronger and more resilient. What hurt me in the past has actually made me better equipped to face the present.” -Steve Goodier 

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What would Mom say?

What would Mom say?

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Mom worked full-time while raising four children and she wanted it to be easier for me than it was for her. When I was in high school, she bought me a t-shirt that said, “A Woman’s Place is in the House and the Senate” and I recall both positive and negative remarks from teachers and classmates when I proudly wore it to school. Mom was a proud feminist, subscribed to Ms. magazine, and referred to herself as a member of the “women’s libber movement“.

I remember conversations with my Mom about discriminatory work practices that were so common in her generation and still in mine.  I was sexually harassed when I was younger.  I was french kissed by one boss while still in high school and in another, whistled at and catcalled every time I walked out on a factory floor. Female co-workers would warn me about certain male bosses not to accept lunch invitations from.  When I had a joint banking account with my husband at a local credit union in the 80’s, I wasn’t allowed to conduct certain financial transactions because he was listed as the “primary” on the account.

Mom shared a ridiculous story about when she smoked in her early twenties, which was in the 1950’s, that she had to do so in the basement of her own home because good wives of teachers didn’t smoke in public or were even seen smoking through their own home windows.

Mom was my role model.  She showed me how to  juggle career and family on a daily basis, how to get organized, how to manage my time, how to carve out small moments for self-care, how to stand up for myself and how to ask for help and get it. She helped many women and children in her career in social services trying to reduce barriers, provide support, and improve the human condition.

I know Mom would be surprised by today’s attacks on human rights and would support a renewed wave of support for all to include policies to:

  • pay the same as men do for the same job
  • recognize and value doing so much of the hard work required or expected of raising children
  • become much better at supporting working women, and mothers
  • support choices
  • control our own destiny in this world, without regard to our gender, race and physical appearance

Mom died a long time ago when I was in my 30’s. What would Mom say if she was alive today?

I know she would be shocked at current events especially the hate talk, backtracking on human rights and loss of decorum in our government leaders.  She would say – you can do and be better.

1987

1987

In honor of Throwback Thursday I write this blog post.

I am on a planning committee for a party to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Women’s Policy Forum of Tarrant County.   We decided on a throw-back theme to the founding year, 1987. The party is open to the public on March 2nd at the Fort Worth Public Library as we wpfcelebrate Women’s History Month. Attendees are encouraged to wear 1980’s attire — you know, the big hair, puffy shoulder pads, and bangles in honor of the Bangles.  Here is the link to the schedule of events for the month:  Women’s History Month Schedule of Events

 

On the planning committee, I volunteered to prepare a song playlist for the party so over the holiday break I have been compiling a list.   This also happens to be the year that C1 was born.  Wow — 30 years ago in 2017.  Debbie Gibson made the list (double wow).  Love me some Heart and Bruce Hornsby. 

Here are the top hits with the Bangles Walk Like an Egyptian as No. #1!

Position  ▾ Artist Song Title
credit:  bobborst.com
1 Bangles Walk Like An Egyptian
2 Heart Alone
3 Gregory Abbott Shake You Down
4 Whitney Houston I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)
5 Starship Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now
6 Robbie Nevil C’est La Vie
7 Whitesnake Here I Go Again
8 Bruce Hornsby and The Range The Way It Is
9 Bob Seger Shakedown
10 Bon Jovi Livin’ On A Prayer
11 Los Lobos La Bamba
12 Wang Chung Everybody Have Fun Tonight
13 Crowded House Don’t Dream It’s Over
14 Atlantic Starr Always
15 U2 With Or Without You
16 Jody Watley Looking For A New Love
17 Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam Head To Toe
18 Tiffany I Think We’re Alone Now
19 Billy Idol Mony Mony
20 Billy Vera and The Beaters At This Moment
21 Chris De Burgh The Lady In Red
22 Whitney Houston Didn’t We Almost Have It All
23 U2 I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For
24 George Michael I Want Your Sex
25 Duran Duran Notorious
26 Debbie Gibson Only In My Dreams
27 Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes (I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life
28 Peter Cetera and Amy Grant The Next Time I Fall
29 Club Nouveau Lean On Me
30 Madonna Open Your Heart
31 Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam Lost In Emotion
32 Cutting Crew (I Just) Died In Your Arms
33 T’pau Heart And Soul
34 Kim Wilde You Keep Me Hangin’ On
35 Georgia Satellites Keep Your Hands To Yourself
36 Aretha Franklin and George Michael I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)
37 Janet Jackson Control
38 Prince U Got The Look
39 Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram Somewhere Out There
40 Genesis Land Of Confusion
41 Huey Lewis and The News Jacob’s Ladder
42 Madonna Who’s That Girl
43 Jets You Got It All
44 Samantha Fox Touch Me (I Want Your Body)
45 Michael Jackson and Siedah Garrett I Just Can’t Stop Loving You
46 Madonna Causing A Commotion
47 Genesis In Too Deep
48 Janet Jackson Let’s Wait Awhile
49 Huey Lewis and The News Hip To Be Square
50 Chicago Will You Still Love Me?