Urban Walks in NYC

Urban Walks in NYC

When RM and I visit a city, we like to walk the streets, feel the pavement under our feet, and begin to understand what makes this unique urban space tick.  When we walk, there is time to appreciate the architecture, to observe the river, to revel in the nooks and crannies and hidden sight lines. A peek-a-boo into the city soul.

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Our tour guide, C1

The traffic stops and starts, sidewalk cafes beckon us over as we look for the past in the shuttered windows and trellised ledges.  The smell of spices and exhaust fumes mix along with the potent piles of rubbish oozing the remains of the day. We wince and turn away but continue our journey across Midtown streets in the light rain.  51st to 49th to catch a risqué Broadway musical or down to lower Manhattan to pose with the Fearless Girl facing down the Wall Street Bull, stepping carefully around and over obstacles, avoiding the flagpole banner-bearing pied pipers.

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City trash, everywhere

A good wander unveils many truths and unexpected gems of discovery some painful to observe like the crack zombies stumbling beside us on our way to Red Rooster brunch or the morning after remnants from a night too hard on Times Square. Getting lost is part and parcel to the urban walking experience.  Getting found again with someone you love is like renewing your vows all over again.

Nowhere is walking more surreally varied and trance-inducing than in New York City. We boomerang from Harlem to Greenpoint to Lower Manhattan to the Upper East Side and back down again to the Brooklyn Bridge. We cross the East River by ferry to Smorgasburg, an open-air food mecca held every Saturday in an empty lot on the Williamsburg waterfront.  It is like a summer rock festival for foodies both alluring and sweaty.  We balance small plates on a rock ledge abandoned from a Domino sugar refinery while sipping fresh coconut water directly out of it’s cracked, greenish hull.  The whole place smells like Marrakesh, I imagine. We trek on through the heat to the cool insides of the Artists and Fleas to find a treasure or two.

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RM & I on the Brooklyn Bridge

We shuffle slowly through the Guggenheim, spiraling down beside masterpieces by Klee and Pollack inspired to try a sketch or two.  We look up at the Freedom Tower and down into the reflecting pools and worry when will it happen again, and where, and how many. We rest in Central Park until the algal bloom drives us up and out for gasps of fresher air and back to our pod for the night.

Reinvigorated in the morning after a good night’s sleep, clean socks, and a NY bagel, we complete one of the most popular walks in NYC.  We cross over the Brooklyn Bridge on foot, feed our pizza pie-hole at the popular Juliana’s, located next to the more famous Grimaldi’s Pizzeria, and then journey back over in the moonlight with a throng of tourists snapping selfies from every angle while strolling the crowded boardwalk straddling this proud American architectural feat. Back to the pod by Metro this time, too tired for another trek uptown by foot.

C1 joins us on our walking itinerary as she is living in the Big Apple this summer and is excited to see all that NYC offers in two short months.  We took the Metro when prudent but enjoyed strolls along High Line Park one late afternoon before the summer heat wave necessitated a call for Uber. Too hot to walk even to the nearest Metro station.

Whether seeing the city on foot, by subway, taxi or ferry, the important part is to experience travel with the ones you love, even if it is only you. So, find yourself a path to follow and learn to walk again. You’ve waited too long. Happy Independence Day, sweet travelers.

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My niece joins us for bruch at the Red Rooster
My Waffle House

My Waffle House

We woke up to a steady rainfall and rumbling tummies  Not sure why rain equates to craving waffles on this drizzly morn but it did. I am not a fan of Waffle House because it is essentially a little, yellow box of grease so I broke open the newly acquired, The Love and Lemons Cookbook, by Austin author Jeanine Donofrio, and decided to test drive a new recipe titled Vegan Carrot Waffles. RM groaned behind me as he peered over my shoulder at the title of the recipe.  #WaffleHouse is trending in his mind. My healthy cooking preferences often tests his middle of America meat, potato, vegetable mentality. But I ignored his whimpers because when I reviewed the ingredient list, while vegan, these waffles were also dairy free. And the carrots made sense because who doesn’t love a good carrot cake?

We have two family members whose bodies recently have declared war on dairy in any form. But they still love waffles.  So Mom wanted to give this waffle recipe a shot so when they visit next time we can pull out the beloved Texas shaped waffle maker and whip up a batch. Admit it, how many states are so proud they have a waffle iron shaped to their image? Ok, Colorado, maybe, since it is the state most resembling a square or perhaps, Wyoming? Which one is more Belgian waffle-like to you, dear reader.

Back to the recipe.

In a bowl, combine 2 cups of whole wheat flour, 2 tsp. baking powder, 2 Tablespoons ground yellow flax (I keep a baggie full in my freezer, don’t you?) and 1/2 tsp. of cinnamon.

In another bowl, combine 1 cup grated carrots (about 3 medium size ones), 2 cups almond milk at room temperature, 1/4 cup of melted coconut oil (I pick this item up at Trader Joe’s (TJ’s)), 1 tsp. of your best vanilla, 2 Tablespoons of real maple syrup and a dash of sea salt.

Fold the carrot goo into the dry ingredients and stir until just combined.  Cook the batter in a preheated waffle iron.  They come out fluffy but crisp on the edges.   Serve with maple syrup (and a little bit of butter if you dare), fresh berries and mint from your garden.   A side of bacon can’t hurt especially on such a mucky Sunday morning.  I cook my bacon on a cookie tray in a hot oven.  You may elect to sprinkle a little honey and smoked black pepper on the strips before baking (put down some aluminum foil on the pan first for easy clean up). I like my bacon crunchy too.

This is one hearty breakfast.  A Texas-sized waffle will fill you up.

Now that the sun it out, go out and plow the back forty. It never stays wet and dreary for long in the Lone Star State.

You should check out the author’s Love and Lemons blog for more wholesome, yummy options. Pretty pictures too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casserole Queen

Casserole Queen

Not everything retro needs to return and the highly processed casserole or hot dish is one that needs to remain in the past.  My mom was the casserole queen of Main Street (we really did live on Main Street) in Anytown, USA in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Give mom a pantry stocked with Campbell’s Soup, a freezer full of Birds Eye vegetables and a protein and she had a hearty meal on the table in 30 minutes or less.  Oh, yeah, don’t forget the carb (rice, noodles, or biscuit).

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Queen of the Casserole

Casserole was her nightly “go-to” for this busy working mom due to its versatility, as well as the time-saving aspect of literally throwing everything in the ingredient pool at once. But most importantly how economical these oven-baked creations were for her raising a family of four kids, three of the growing boy, eating machine variety.  Casseroles were everywhere back then.  In school lunches, at potluck dinners and always at church suppers. Taste was never the point, it was how quickly and cheaply, it could get to the table.  These dishes were so full of salt and other highly addictive, unnatural, preservatives that we soon grew to love, crave, the comforting taste of the goo.

Recipes from Attendees at my Wedding Shower

I still love the stuff. Green bean casserole anyone?  But I no longer use canned soup (RM still tries to slip celery and mushroom soup into the pantry), use more fresh vegetables and limit the fat, sugar and salt content in our dishes. I still make some of the old dishes especially the ones from my hand-written or typed recipe collection but I have found ways to lighten them up and get rid of all the preservatives.

The first dish I learned to make in my youth was a goulash casserole.  Mom’s recipe went like this:

Brown two pounds of ground beef.  Add one can of tomato paste, one can of mushroom soup, one can of corn, 1 /2 lb. of Velveeta, liberal dash of salt, pepper, paprika (it’s why we called it goulash) and cooked egg noodles.  Place in your Corningware French White casserole dish (still have one) and bake at 350 degrees until hot and bubbly.  What’s not love?  It’s a heart stopper!

Other favorites from her recipe box included tuna casserole with canned peas, tuna, celery soup and generous amounts of Miracle Whip with those same egg noodles and bake it until heated through. Or my personal favorite — hotdog casserole made with cut up hot dogs, chopped bacon, canned baked beans, dollops of catsup, mustard and Worcestershire (say that three times fast) sauce, and topped with slices of American cheese. Bake until processed cheese is melted and browned. Takes less than 30 minutes. Good gracious those hot dishes were good. Good eating!  Easy fixing! As the ad below reinforced. And so bad.

To my mother’s credit, she learned that cooking like this was harmful to our health and she changed our diets considerably in the late 70’s with weekly, scratch made bread, Czech-style noodles and yogurt, seeking out local, farm raised eggs and chickens, and lots of dark greens from her garden including tons of fresh herbs.  So like her, let’s leave these greasy gratins and other overly processed colon clogging combinations behind us, where they must stay, for the sake of our hearts, and only in our memories.

Thousand Steps Beach

Thousand Steps Beach

Thousand Steps Beach is a rocky beach below homes high on the bluff  near Shoreline Park in Santa Barbara, California.  To reach the beach at low tide, requires a long hike down a stairway.  The concrete stairs, originally constructed in 1923, have what seems like 1000 steps, but is actually closer to 150. On our recent holiday to California, we enjoyed watching the sunset from Shoreline Park and searched out Thousand Steps Beach one evening but returned the next morning to discover that the tides, at high tide, cover the entire beach and come up several feet on the concrete stairs which explains the erosion of the steps on the lower half.  So pretty that I had to take a posed picture of C2 and her fiance on the steps.

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Another fun find on our journey was the largest Moreton Bay Fig Tree in the United States.  It is hidden behind a very active Amtrak Train Station near State Street and the Stearns Wharf and was planted in 1876 and is estimated to be 80 feet tall.  There are signs all over it to keep folks off but when we stopped by two young kids were climbing all over her grand branches.  Hard to resist.

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It was a beautiful day to explore all of Santa Barbara and beside finding the majestic fig, we explored the more common tourists stops of the Courthouse and Mission Santa Barbara as well as walked State Street (all shopping and restaurants) and the wharf area.  While we were visiting some foolish tourist from Chicago, drove his car off the side of the wharf. Thankfully, he had just dropped of his wife and daughter at the ice cream store before he drove his rental off the side of the dock.  Something about mistaking the brake for the gas pedal?  How do you explain that one around the water cooler?

We had lunch on the one rainy day at the Cold Spring Tavern, outside of SB, warmed by a two-sided rock fireplace and great service. This place was originally a stagecoach stop back in 1865 and has been serving good grub ever since. We sampled buffalo burgers, venison and Tri-tip sandwiches.  Tri-tip is everywhere in this part of CA as I learned it originated just up the 101 at Santa Maria as a great cut to prepare like we do brisket or pot roast in Texas.

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As an alternative to wine, which is everywhere in these parts, we enjoyed an afternoon of watching bowl games and drinking Davy Brown Ale at the Fig Brewing Company  located near our motel.  We did the wine tasting thing, driving up into the scenic Santa Ynez Valley, but I have to say after a couple of stops, all four in our party were done with commenting about how “oaky” or “spicy” we found the small sips. How many souvenir wine glasses and bottles of wine can a girl pack in her suitcase?  Three to be exact.

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New Years Eve we dined at The Lark in the Funk Zone of Santa Barbara.  We sat outside between a heater and a fireplace on a very cool night, after a day of rain. The highlights for me were the oysters on the half shell sprinkled with chilled wine granita and salmon roe along with the scallops swimming in a lobster bisque.  Our dessert and New Year toast was with a great bourbon just to warm up.  Why is it that some of the warmest places to visit often seem the chilliest when you are not expecting it?

Did you know that Santa Barbara is very proud of their tacos?  Taco Trail is how it is billed. We tried a couple different varieties at La-Super Rica.  We were hyped up for fish tacos but on the night we visited we were limited to only beef and pork.  My favorite was the hand-made tortillas made fresh for each plate, grilled just right, as well as the general vibe of the place. The prices can’t be beat at $2.50/taco for most options.

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As always, travel experiences often bring surprises, plans not quite to perfection, but always we learn something new and unexpected about ourselves, the world we live in, as we take a thousand steps and more together in 2017.  Try not to fall off the dock.

Products I Love to Give and Get

Products I Love to Give and Get

Today, I am blogging about products I love that I have recently added to my growing collection of eclectic tastes here on Ashland or gifted to a friend.  First up, is the white enamel tiffin carrier or cool lunch box by Riess made in Austria.  I found these functional beauties in a little shop in Oak Cliff called Set and Co.  Mine is two layers but they make this model in three layers and more.  These are used widely in south Asia to deliver lunch to workers.  I use mine for serving stir fry dishes.  The rice goes in the bottom container and the veggies go up top.  It would be fun to take to a friend for dinner or to your next pot luck.

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