Furikake Rice Seasoning

Furikake Rice Seasoning

I discovered furikake seasoning when reading a blog by Sean Brock, chef of several great restaurants located in the low-country of South Carolina.  I like his cooking because he is all about the vinegar,  bbq sauces, and other secret ingredients from the pantry.

Furikake is a savory and salty seasoning used in Japanese cuisine for sprinkling on rice.  The main ingredients in a good furikake is dried fish, seaweed and the ALL important toasted sesame seeds which combined emote a sublime salty and umami flavor.

I order my supply of furikake from Furikake Rice Seasoning

Recently, I sprinkled some of this seasoning on my avocado toast along with a splash of soy sauce and srirachi and it took it to new heights.  You can sprinkle furikake on salads, soups and of course on steamed rice.  I  also say out loud furikake, three times fast in a row,  and amaze RM with my japanese vocabulary.

Furikake

Furikake

Furikake

Enjoy!

 

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Veteran’s Day Tribute

Veteran’s Day Tribute

My dad was a First Lieutenant in the United States Air Force from 1952-54 and served in Japan.  None of his children or grandchildren followed his path of military service as we came of age during the Vietnam War.  My brothers received draft cards but opted to stay in college to delay a call to active duty much to my mother’s delight.

My dad helped run a commissary and he shared stories of the rebuilding years in Japan after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  He and my mother employed a young Japanese woman to help with my older two brothers, a toddler and an infant, she then traveled home into the country on week-ends but she lived with my parents during the week.  My father talked of the hunger of the Japanese people, especially the children, at that time due to food shortages and a poor economy after the lengthy and brutal war.

Recently, RM and I watched the series The Vietnam War by Ken Burns and Lynn Novak on PBS. If you have a loved one who has a story to share about their experience during the Vietnam War, click the link above where they can upload their personal story or read others.  Remembering and sharing stories are important of this war or of other more current conflicts.

How did you experience the Vietnam era? While this period in our history is often controversial and sometimes divisive, what struck me, while watching the documentary, was how much I had forgotten about the sequence of events, the dimensions of the war, but not the sacrifices on both sides.  During WWII, estimates are 60 million people died in all. During Vietnam the casualty counts vary from 1.3 million to 3.9 million.

This Veteran’s Day, I mourn the lives lost and for those struggling for normalcy after their tours of service.  This Veteran’s Day do something meaningful for a veteran in your life.  Ask them about their service.  Encourage them to tell their story.  Help them mow their lawn or babysit their kids for the night.

Watch the documentary and remember their sacrifice and the many sacrifices of young men and women in other wars. And pray for peace and for the keepers of peace and for no more war.veterans day

Pumpkin Jam

Pumpkin Jam

img_1164When C3 and I vacationed in Boston this summer, we scoped out a restaurant in Cambridge called Sofra Bakery and Cafe,  Our dirty little secret is to  someday co-create a coffee/bakery concept. When we travel to explore new places, we look for  bakeries, cafes and bistros to steal ideas and recipes from for our little fantasy bake shop.

Sofra is a turkish word meaning picnic, a special table preparation of food, or a small kilim rug for eating. At Sofra, they serve aromatic turkish coffee and chai along with a wide variety of middle eastern inspired breads, meze, shawarmas, savory pies and persian spiced donuts.

So, this week-end, when everything is pumpkin-inspired for the autumnal season that refuses to come to Texas,  I attempted to copy Sofra’s pumpkin jam recipe.  I had two smaller sugar or pie pumpkins left from Halloween that I cut up and roasted and then pureed in the food processor before combining with sugar and spices.  Here is the link to the recipe Sofra’s pumpkin jam

This recipe makes enough for gifts for the holidays.  I hanker for a special pairing with soft dinner rolls for Thanksgiving dinner.  I added a pinch of mace to the recipe which I think made it even better.  The aroma alone of the jam is worth the toil of cutting up the pumpkin.

This jam is extra rich and exotic. So, pumpkin jam, is definitely on the menu for our daydream bakery.